qinni:

Backgrounds. I understand perspective. I can draw a box using 1, 2, and 3-point perspective. However when it comes down to drawing a figure in relation to an object everything comes out all out of whack. One of my common problems is that figure looks like they’re floating. Do you have any tips for drawing backgrounds outside of the standard perspective tutorial? Anything about figures in relation to backgrounds? Any crash course practices?
Well, I don’t think the problem you’re having is perspective related at all, actually. I hope these tips will help you? but I can’t be completely sure if this is the answer you’re looking for though hahaha. Hope it helps anyways xD. It was a good chance for me to do some speed tonal stuff too :D.
could u make a video on levestream and use photoshop instead of paint tool sai?
Hi, sorry, photoshop is so load-heavy that it’s slow enough on my computer without livestream running as well. I don’t think i’ll be able to paint properly on my poor HP with those two running D;. I tried getting a new laptop but….sorry, i won’t get into it, but let’s just say that supposedly good laptops keep crapping out on me and i had to return them :(. 

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - No Straight Lines

Curved lines > Straight lines. That’s it.

Norm

How to Improve Flat Characters

fictionwritingtips:

If you’re having trouble making your characters interesting or you feel like all your characters turn out the same, you’re probably creating flat characters. If your character hasn’t undergone a significant change during the course of your novel or your audience is having trouble relating to them, you need find ways to improve this. It’s important to remember that all your characters need to have goals, no matter how small, and they need to be actively working toward those goals to stay interesting.

Your protagonist should be relatable and realistic. Even if your readers don’t necessarily agree with what they’re doing, they should be able to feel what your protagonist is going through. This is your job as a writer. You need to get your readers to understand their thought process or what they’re going through, even if they’ve never experienced it themselves. This can be achieved by using real-life emotions in your story, so it’s important you don’t ignore the emotional aspects of storytelling. Most people will understand love, fear, sadness, happiness—EVEN if they’ve never been in the situation your protagonist is in.

One of the most important things to remember is that your character’s actions should remain realistic. And I don’t mean that they need to do things only we can do in our world, but their actions need to stay true to their world. Their actions should make sense in context to what they’re going through.

Your protagonist should also be a problem solver and proactive. A character with good morals will have integrity, but we all know not all main character have good intentions. However, all protagonists should be able to do things on their own, or else they’re going to be a weak protagonist. I’m not saying they don’t need help, but they need to overcome the big challenges on their own. They can’t just stand around waiting for everyone else to finish things. They need to take initiative at some point, and this should be due to their personal growth throughout the story.

Here are some tips on improving flat characters:

Focus on primary traits, complexity traits, and character flaws.

Primary traits: Every character you write should have primary traits. These are things like smart, funny, inquisitive, etc. These aren’t necessarily anything deep, but they give the reader enough to understand what sort of category or archetype that character fits in.

Complexity traits: Adding complexity traits will be what adds more depth to your characters, and will make your characters interesting. This is necessary if you are building lead characters/main characters. With complexity traits, you plan out the primary traits with more detail. For example, if your character is smart explain what he or she is smart in. Does he or she know a lot about history? Are they good at math?

Character Flaws: Finally, give that character flaws. These flaws humanize your characters and they generally stand in the way of your character’s success.  It’s important that your characters fail sometimes and that these failures are a result of their personal flaws. No one wants to see a perfect character. We want to see someone who is able to pull themselves back together after experiencing failure. We want to see them earn their success.

Next, focus on character goals and motivations.

Character goals: Every single character your write needs to want something. They need to have a goal and those goals will drive your story forward. For example, your main character might want to run a marathon. It’s a big deal for them and they spend your entire novel training (and failing at training) until the end when they finally do it. Running that marathon is their goal throughout your novel and they won’t stop until they succeed. Remember, character goals are different from motivations.

Also, keep in mind that even secondary characters need to want something. Develop each character and make sure you understand why they want to do something. What do they get from helping out your main character? Why do they care so much? Think about what’s at stake for them.

Motivations: There are certain things that will push your characters forward. Expanding on the marathon scenario above, maybe your main character has to finish a marathon because they will win 1 million dollars if they do. Maybe their family is poor and this is the only way to help them. That’s your character motivation. It’s obvious they really care about their family and they need the money. It’s important to understand why your character is doing something and why they want something. What will accomplishing their goals do for them? Why do they need to do? Again, what’s at stake if they don’t?

Character development is a long, in-depth process, but hopefully following these steps will help you out. It’s important that you keep your characters proactive or else you run the risk of them becoming boring. Characters that work actively toward their goals are the most interesting.

-Kris Noel

5 Common Story Problems with Simple Fixes

fictionwritingtips:

Our stories are often plagued with these common story problems, but if we don’t know how to fix them, we’ll never improve our writing. It’s important that you remember you don’t need to scrap your novel if you keep having the same issues over and over again. Hopefully this list will help you pinpoint what’s going on and provide ways for you to improve your novel.

Problem: Unmotivated Characters

If you’re having trouble figuring out where your story should go next, the problem could be with unmotivated characters. Characters aren’t in your novel just so you can push them around every once in a while and make them do things. They need to develop over time and keep your story going in the right direction.

Solution:

Work on your character’s wants, goals, and motivations. You need to figure out what’s driving your character if you want them to do anything. Where do they want to end up? What’s standing in their way? What’s their plan? Who will help them? Think about everything your character will need to do to resolve your novel. Focus on what they want and what motivates their actions and your characters will stop being dull and lifeless.

Problem: Boring First Chapters

A boring first chapter is dangerous because you want to captivate your audience right away. You don’t want to lose readers just because of this, but sometimes it happens.  You should give enough information to keep your readers interested, while also keeping them intrigued enough to figure out what happens next.

Solution:

Putting emotion into your scenes from the beginning will not only help set the tone, but we’ll get an immediate understanding of your world. The best advice I can give is to construct a scene that helps us best understand your character. If they’re on the run, show us that they’re being chased. If they’re sad and lonely, construct a scene that lets us feel their isolation. You don’t necessarily need to open your book with action, but you do need to introduce the conflict. Think about what your character wants and go from there. Think of your first chapter as an introduction to an essay. You don’t go right into the points immediately, but you set us up for something good.

Problem: Plot Holes

Writers worry about forgetting to include important information in their novel that’s necessary to the plot. If you’re discovering that readers often point out plot holes in your story, maybe it’s time to reevaluate how you plan your novel.

Solution:

Pre-planning or prewriting your novel often solves any plot hole problems. If you take the time to write out important scenes so you don’t forget them, your story will become stronger. However, if you’re not someone who likes to do so much planning, you can tackle plot holes during the editing phase. Take notes when you’re editing so that you can catch these plot holes and figure out where you can add necessary information. A plot hole does not always mean your novel needs loads of reworking, but it is something you need to take the time to fill in.

Problem: Poor Pacing

Poor pacing can ruin a novel, but luckily it’s something you can tackle head on before you even start writing your story. Good pacing helps add tension to your novel and helps you make sure there’s enough rising and falling action to keep your story interesting.

Solution:

Planning out your novel ahead of time also helps solve pacing problems. You can create a timeline that helps you keep track and plan out when you want certain things to happen. Read up on story arcs and try to plan out your scenes accordingly. If you’re already done with your novel and you notice poor pacing, try rearranging scenes or spreading out the action.

Problem: Info-Dumping

A very common writing problem is info-dumping. This is when you tell your readers loads of information at a time without showing them anything important. Info-dumps usually occur in first chapters of novels, but they can happen anytime during the course of your story. Info- dumps can drag down your story and bore your readers.

Solution:

Cut out long paragraphs where you explain what’s going on in your novel and show your readers instead. Avoid over explaining things that can be explained through action. Letting your audience figure things out instead is a much more satisfying reading experience and it lets your readers connect with your characters on a deeper level.

-Kris Noel

30 Days of Art Improvement Challenge

pencilcat:

Are you tired of feeling like your art just isn’t improving? Do you want to do a 30-day challenge that’s actually useful? Welcome to 30 Days of Improvement Hell. >:D

I made this because I’ve been feeling super ‘blah’ about my art these days, and I needed something to kick-start myself. Who wants to do this with me!? Start now or whenever you can (now you procrastinators!). Challenge yourself and have fun at the same time!

Tag your posts with #Improvement Hell so everyone can follow along and see each other’s awesome artwork. I may even create a blog and reblog them! :D

What are you waiting for? START!

  1. Self-Portrait - Introduce yourself
  2. Draw a figure using a reference - link to reference
  3. Draw a figure that’s in action, using a reference - link to reference
  4. Draw a part of the human anatomy you have trouble with. x20, with atleast 5 being skeletal/musculature studies.
  5. Draw more figures. Quick gestures and silhouettes. x20, with atleast 10 different body shapes
  6. Let’s have some fun. Design a character from this character generator. (created by PreservedCucumbers)
  7. Pick the weirdest object in your house/room. Draw it. Shadows and Highlights.
  8. Find 2-3 objects, make a scene with them. Draw it. Bonus points for creativity. Double points for dramatic lighting.
  9. Draw a landscape of a place you’ve never been or drawn.
  10. Draw a BG with 1pt Perspective. Negative points if it’s a railroad or an empty street.
  11. Draw a BG with 2pt Perspective.
  12. Look out a window. Draw what you see. Bonus points for adding something interesting.
  13. Draw an interior setting with the character you designed on Day #6 in it.
  14. BG with either bird’s eye or worm’s eye view.
  15. Halfway there! Draw three ‘action’ scenes with different compositions in each. Quick sketches are fine, just make them interesting and understandable! Bonus points if it’s the same scene, but different composition.
  16. Draw a single page comic with 5-7 panels (the story begins and ends on one page). 
  17. Draw an animal you’ve never drawn before. x10  Link references.
  18. Draw a car. Negative points for whining. Hint: Use a perspective grid.
  19. Think of the thing you hate drawing the most. Guess what? Draw it! Negative points for lying to yourself.
  20. Pick an object in your house/room. Now design a character from it, using the shapes, forms, textures, purpose and colors as inspiration. Also link/post the object you used. Negative points for using a humanoid action figure.
  21. Draw a character/object/scene, and shade them using ONLY solid blacks and whites. Bonus points for good use of lights/shadows
  22. Draw a different object/scene/character. Shade using hatching, crosshatcing, and/or pointillism. Bonus points for lights/shadows and textures.
  23. Colors! Pick a color palette, and paint a scene/character/object using only those colors (some blending allowed). Bonus points for good use of lights/shadows.
  24. Draw and color a scene/object/character - no lines allowed! (aka - lineless art). Don’t forget light and shadows!
  25. Draw a scene/character in a style you’ve never drawn before. If emulating an artist, credit+link. Bonus for color style.
  26. Draw a character. Draw 10 emotions/expressions. Bonus points for ‘uncommon’ emotions. (i.e. anxiety, guilt, despair, loneliness etc.)
  27. Draw three random shapes using your opposite hand (or your foot). Now design characters from those shapes.
  28. Turn on the tv (or load your illegally downloaded movies). Pick an actor and draw them.
  29. Almost done! Let’s have some fun. Draw some fanart. Bonus points if it’s super obscure and unknown. Make people guess what it’s from.
  30. Last day! Find a drawing you did within the last year. Now draw it again using what you’ve learned! Link it for comparison!

 Look at all that amazing improvement! Congrats!

[Update] There is now a sequel challenge, Draw All The Things!

anatomicalart:

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

FEETSSSS!!!!!!!!!!

[From various sources]

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

falvie:

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

Good for more than just writing!

artist tips

thefrogman:

suchirolle:

rileyav:

don’t save as jpeg

as a former yearbook editor and designer, let me explain this further

if youre only planning on posting your art online, them please save it as .png ;this is also better for transparencies as well

BUT

please, if youre planning of printing your art, NEVER use png. it makes the quality of the image pretty shitty. use jpeg or pdf instead. and always set your work at 300dpi to get a better printing quality - this means, the images are crisper and sharper and theres no slight blurriness. i had a talk with my friend who is currently taking design, and pdf is much better to use when youre working with a bigger publishing company because it still has the layers intact, but if youre only planning on printing your stuff at staples or at some small publishing store, the jpeg is the way to go.

this has been a public service announcement

This post has about 30,000 notes and a lot of back and forth on what you should and shouldn’t do. Part of this is because there is a lot of personal preference when it comes to printing. People like to work with different formats and equipment because that is what they learned on. They achieve basically the same things through different methods and much like Mac/PC… there is much debate.

I don’t have a degree in anything but maybe I can clear a few things up.

First of all, if you are printing things yourself, there is no reason to convert your photoshop or illustrator document to anything else before printing. So keeping it a PSD or AI file is fine. If you are having someone else print your document, ask them how they prefer the file to be formatted. They will choose the best option for their experience and equipment.

Keep in mind you will get sharper prints if you adjust your document’s pixels per inch to match the printer. Epsons are 360ppi. Most other manufacturers are 300ppi. Sometimes people erroneously refer to this as dpi, so just be aware of that.

I wrote a more detailed post on how big you should make your art here.

On file formats…

JPEG - This compresses your image to make the file size smaller. This can cause quality loss because it is basically throwing away data. This is especially hard on text, graphics, and simpler artwork. Fine lines can get jagged and pixelated during the compression process. However, photos and photo-realistic art will look just fine. 

That means JPEGs are ideal for posting photographs or highly detailed artwork online. They are compatible with all browsers and will load much faster for people with slow connections. At the sizes people view JPEGs on the web, it will be hard to see the loss of quality.

As long as the resolution is good and the compression is minimal, you can still get nice prints from a jpeg, but it is not ideal.

TIFF - This is basically a super JPEG. It has no compression and is compatible with most image editors. It handles colors well and prints nicely. Due to its robust compatibility, most printers can handle TIFFs with no worries. If I had to save a file into a flattened format, TIFF is probably my choice. The disadvantage is that the file sizes can be very large and you cannot publish TIFFs online in very many places. 

PNG - These are typically used for web-based graphic design or simple artwork. They are compatible with all browsers and allow you to preserve transparency. They also render text and fine lines much better than JPEGs. If you were posting more cartoon-like artwork online or something very graphical (charts and graphs) this would be a good option. File sizes can get big with more complicated images. I don’t recommend saving photos or photo-realistic artwork as PNGs.

In my experience I have found that color rendering with PNGs is a bit unreliable, so I would probably avoid this format for printing purposes. 

PDF - This is basically a container. You can throw whatever you want into a PDF. It will maintain the quality of the images you put inside it. PDFs are great for multi-page documents. Especially if they are a mix of graphics, art, text, and photos. If you don’t have experience using publishing software like InDesign, this is a good alternative for these types of jobs. If you only have one page to print, I’m not sure it is worth the trouble of making it a PDF. 

RGB vs CMYK 
I recommend always starting your document in the RGB colorspace and converting it later only if needed. It is rare that you do not publish on the web, and RGB is much more suited for that. Converting from RGB to CMYK is much easier than the other way around. 

If you are printing yourself, you are probably using an inkjet. Modern inkjets do great RGB conversion and in some cases will handle it better than CMYK. You can try both formats, but in the end you will just have to accept the fact that nothing you can do will get you a perfect color match. The goal is to get a good print. View it and judge it independently of what is on your screen. Do not drive yourself mad trying to get them to match perfectly. 

If you are having someone else print your work, again, ask them what they prefer. If they have large offset printers, they may ask for CMYK. If they have inkjets, they may just want RGB files. If this is a very large printing operation, your printer should want to do any color conversions themselves. If they do not, I might suggest looking for a different printer.

I hope that is helpful. Happy printing.

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Clear Silhouette

Silhouette in character posing is crucial. It will make or break a design, storyboard or animated piece. Have a great Tuesday everyone!

Norm

*Message me for more suggestions on Tuesday Tips!

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