smashega:

Some cartoon tutorials I’ve found but can’t find the source for.

They’re by Preston Blair! These are scans from his book “Advanced Animation”

Hello, I am having problems with Sai brush textures. I have the Elemap files in the elemap folder but when I open Sai and check the textures they don't show up. I tried moving the Elemap files to the blotmap folder and it shows up in the textures but doesn't affect the brush when used. Help? I really need those textures. Thank you very much.
belleillumina

right hold up, let me explain what the different folders mean:

elemap: The shape of the brush you wish to use, depending on how you place the pixels the stroke that the brush produces will change.
The only colour that will be detected by SAI is pure black, no greys, no colours.

Make sure you save the elemap as a bmp in SAI, as there’s a couple different types of bitmap and you might not save it correctly elsewhere.

blotmap: the brush will be a simple circle, what the blotmap determines is how the brush will, well, blot.

the simple circle brush

This is the spread blotmap with 0 edge hardness

this is the spread blotmap with edge hardness at 100%

This is what the blotmap looks like:

The different shades determine how much or how little colour will be placed on the canvas.

brushtex: this is where your textures should be going. This is where you put textures you want to apply to your brush tip itself

the setting is located on your brush settings

papertex: this is where textures for the entire layer go.

the setting is located under paint effect and on your layer settings

From the sounds of things, you’re trying to put a texture where a shape should be, and a texture where a blotmap should be. If you’re trying to use a regular texture as a blotmap, it’s going to have a contrast that’s far too high and you won’t get any mark made. If it’s not the right size, it won’t work as an elemap.

Put it in either brushtex or papertex depending on what effect you’re looking for, and make sure it tiles properly!

How do you draw a profile to match the front face? They end up becoming two different people...
Anonymous

zemael:

I used to have a lot of trouble with this myself until I figured out one simple trick. All you gotta do is know how to work with layers in a program like Photoshop, SAI, Manga Studio, etc, or have a ruler if you’re a traditional artist. 

  • 1. Let’s take a look at this dude. I drew the front of the face first and then tried to match the profile the best I could. Looking at it quickly it seems fine, doesn’t it? (well, other than the eyebrows; I forgot he was frowning.) But when you focus you can tell it looks.. well, off, compared to the one to the left.

  • 2. This part can be a bit tricky. Take each layer and change the lines to a different, contrasting color or make it a different opacity (or both) and then overlap them. To make it less confusing, put the layers as "multiply". This way you can see the lines without confusing them too much.  Try adjusting it to match as good as you can. Now when we have all the parts next to each-other, we can tell what’s wrong. The mouth is too high up, the nose is way too short, the eyes are also too high up, the forehead is too big, and the skull is too small. Thank goodness I at least got the neck and chin right! Let’s adjust these things so that they are at least the right height. (For you traditional artist, just use the ruler to measure the parts!)

  • 3. Now the most obvious things are fixed, and we can see a big improvement. Everything matches height-wise. Nothing is glaringly wrong, but there’s still some details that are off. if you look closely, you can see that the cheek doesn’t quite match up, as well as the eye-shape and the nose shape. Also the expression. (On another note, I made the skull on the blue one a bit smaller, just so you don’t get confused. I noticed it was an anatomy error)

  • 4. Fixed the minor details, and as you can see, there was a major difference. I’m going to make different tutorial on noses later on, but how do you know if a nose is down-turned or up-turned by looking at it from the front? Well, a down-turned nose is usually V-shaped, like the guy in my picture. An up-turned nose usually have more visible nostrils. Anyway. I’m happy with the results, let’s put the finished products next to each other.

  • Yep! We can tell it’s the same guy now. Small things make a huge difference, and this trick is really easy once you get used to it. It might feel a bit trippy at first with all the lines  clashing, but as I said, you get used to it. Let’s see the before-and-after.

  • Not quite the same dude.

But yeah, there you go! If you’re interested to see more of my tutorials, just click [here]. Also, send me an ask if you have any tutorial request, I’d love to help!

fuckingmonsters:

figuring out complicated designs in perspective doesnt have to make you mad so here is good tips to keep in mind. can be used for all kinds of things

The reblog just now about queer characters... forgive my ignorance but any elaboration? What difference? What should we watch out for/aim for? I am finding it hard to understand without any answer given there, not because I'm against queer characters (or indeed people) but because its outside my personal experience.
Anonymous

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

I assume you’re referring to this post, which says: 

There is a difference between:

a queer character whose story doesn’t revolve around them being queer

and

a queer character whose story completely ignores the fact that they are queer

Now, I’m not OP, but let me lay down my personal interpretation for you: 

Something that people sometimes say about a piece of media is that they like how it ‘has a queer character whose story doesn’t revolve around them being queer’. Now, is there anything wrong with queer characters whose stories revolve around them being queer? Nope. However, when your only options are stories with queer characters that revolve around them being queer, it gets old! And gives the impression that the only stories that queer people have are about their queerness, which is peculiar and also dangerous. 

'A story about a queer character that doesn't revolve around them being queer' basically means: This character has various adventures and is queer. 

'A story about a queer character whose story completely ignores the fact that they are queer': This character has various adventures. 

Let me try some examples- let me know if I’m totally off the mark.

Queer character whose story does not revolve around them being queer:
A:
Samantha needs to save the world from rabid space penguins. She has a month in which to defeat them, or the earth will fall. She battles the penguins in awesome intergalactic space fights in a seal-shaped battleship. However, she’s not allowed to tell anyone about this- including her crush, Jules (the fact that she has a crush on Jules is also secret). How many secrets can she keep? How many penguins can she slay??

Queer character whose story completely ignores the fact that they are queer: 
A:
Samantha needs to save the world from rabid space penguins. She has a month in which to defeat them, or the earth will fall. She battles the penguins in awesome intergalactic space fights in a seal-shaped battleship. Also apparently the author says that Samantha is bisexual but literally there is no mention of it in the book ever I mean you cannot just tell us now after thirty-one chapters spread out over three books? You said that she was too busy for romance which is understandable I guess but c’mon she was too busy for it to come up? At all?? Author no please stop. 

(Does it have to be romance? Not remotely.)

Basically: Ignoring the fact that a character is queer is like making it an informed trait (ie if I tell you in the narrative that Samantha is short-tempered but I never or very rarely show her getting angry) rather than a part of the story (Samantha looses her temper twice which goes badly). Should you use stereotypes or cliché to establish that a character is queer? No! Is there a ‘way that queer people act’? no. Is a character’s queerness something that you should just sweep under the proverbial rug in your story? NO. 

I’m curious about how all of you interpreted that post, so please do reblog with your thoughts, and send any corrections to me. 

-Evvy

conceptcookie:

Tutorial: Choosing Interesting Colors by PurpleKecleon

Watch Mel Herring’s (PurpleKecleon) full tutorial on choosing interesting colors HERE. She takes you through her entire process of this piece while talking about how to choose colors to create harmony in your piece!

What To Do If Your Work Is Reposted Without Your Permission

Or what to tell another artist if you see their art reposted.

If the piece was posted by you onto tumblr before the work was reposted, contact tumblr using abuse@tumblr.com

Reposting work is against the TOS and staff will remove the post. This also applies to people tracing your work or otherwise tampering with and posting your work without your permission.

If it’s a piece that has been posted from an artist not on the site and is either unsourced or the artist has requested their work not be reposted, send a message to the artist and link them to http://tumblr.com/dmca

Reposters will sometimes remove the post from their blog if they are contacted, but this does not remove the post from the site and it will remain in circulation.

Staff can and will remove the post completely for you, so unless there’s only a few notes and you can ask people to remove it, contacting staff is a better course of action.

lovelyandbrown:

darkchocolatecreature:

FOR ALL MY SISTAS HAVING TROUBLE FINDING THE RIGHT SHADE OF FOUNDATION/CONCEALER, THE KEY IS TO KNOW YOUR SKIN TONE AND UNDERTONE. HOPE THIS HELPS :)

More info on artbecomesyou.com

artrubzow:

Had a little discussion with polyleisle about blacked out shadows and etc.

I thought I might share my thoughts on it.

anatomy digital art traditional art view all tags